Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Greek Crisis: Tsipras surrenders and folds under pressure


So the Greek people elect a leftist Alexis Tsipras who based his entire Syriza campaign on a socialist, anti-austerity stance. Tsipras goes for a referendum to show the world that not only are the Greek people against austerity (didn’t they do that already? You know…when he got elected?) but that Greeks themselves directly vote if they want to accept more austerity or not. With a strong “no” vote win, it was then only logical that Tsipras would sit with Angela Merkel and the IMF and not only accept more austerity measures than ever before but also sell what’s left of Greek public assets still worth something… oh, wait. Yes, that really doesn’t make any sense. At all.
Premier of Greece, Alexis Tsipras, Accepts Creditors’ Austerity Deal
This just goes to show how much of a lie this Left and Right, Socialist and Capitalists agenda actually is. At the end of the day, Alexis Tsipras showed his true colors and instead of sticking to his guns as the Greek people expected him to do he sold out at the last minute.
What Tsipras did was in fact similar to what then Argentine president Carlos Menem did with his privatization plan of public assets in the 90s. Corporate friendly, Carlos Menem famously announced one day that telecommunications, roads and the national airways company would all be privatized in his now infamous words “Nothing that should be State-owned will remain in the hands of the State”. Words to live by. Ten years later the country would fail catastrophically.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

2 comments:

Don Williams said...

It seems idiotic for the Greek people to shoulder the burden of paying off $380 billion in debt given their present economy. If they renounce the debt then they are that much better off. The idea that an entire people should liable for the debts incurred by corrupt politicans is absurd. Tell the German bankers to go ask
Costas Simitis for the money.

I am baffled by what Tsipras is doing. It only makes sense if he is conning the Germans into giving him an additional $80 billion -- so that he can renege on repaying $460 billion later.

LGM said...

"I am baffled by what Tsipras is doing. It only makes sense if he is conning the Germans into giving him an additional $80 billion -- so that he can renege on repaying $460 billion later. "

I'm pretty sure thats what the Germans think he is doing too, hence they're only trickling the money in. Chances are some of the reforms they want will pass, Tsipras will get kicked out of office, and the new government might actually stick to an austerity plan, and now with the hardest reform hurdles already overcome.
That is, of course, if it doesnt all just go to hell with a messy Grexit, which is just as likley as anything else.