Thursday, December 3, 2015

People in Venezuela Bartering for Survival

Patrons line up on a supermarket parking lot in San Cristobal, Venezuela, in January.
Argentina went through some very tough times but politically it never fell completely into a communist backwards socio-political situation such as the one seen in Venezuela.
Venezuela has been the land of amazing stupidity these last few years thanks to characters such as Hugo Chaves and Nicolas Maduro. How else can you explain a country that runs out of toilet paper and tampons, or where cooking oil, flour and sugar, produced locally are hardly found in supermarkets and only after waiting in line all day?
Chicken for diapers: Bartering abounds in scarcity-stricken Venezuela
Some of the more interesting quotes:
"Like many 16-year-olds, Yannilay Liendo spends the better part of her day glued to Facebook. However, unlike her peers, she’s not using the social media site to connect with friends or catch up on gossip — she’s trying to find diapers and formula for her baby."
"Venezuela’s grinding economic crisis has generated a plethora of problems including triple-digit inflation, shortages of basic goods and massive lines at markets. But it’s also inspiring boot-strap solutions, including a growing number of bartering websites for desperate shoppers."
"In a sense, the economy has turned everyone into a hoarder. On a recent weekday, when a shipment of tampons came into a local pharmacy in an upscale part of Caracas, business men on their lunch break were scooping them up by the handful. While some said they were taking them to their spouses, others said they hoped they might be able to trade them with friends for other toiletries.
"Maria, 24, a reseller who asked for anonymity because re-selling is illegal, said stores in her neighborhood of central Caracas are adapting to the new buying habits by offering baskets of random bundled goods at a fixed price designed to be swapped on the secondary market."
"José Goméz, a 57-year-old public accountant, said it had been five days since he could find sugar or coffee.
“In my house we don’t even know what a bean looks like anymore,” he said. “It’s been eight months since I’ve been able to buy deodorant.”
Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article47429270.html#storylink=cpy

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

"In my house we don’t even know what a bean looks like anymore,” I'm just curious what these people are eating if they can't afford beans. They are the cheapest staple to buy. Does this mean that food is hard to come by also?