Monday, November 16, 2009

Grab the Apple Website

GTA is a project I’ve been working in during this year, along with Texan prepper Luke Walker.
It’s almost impossible to find a person to work along with, that understands what you mean and has skills that compliment your own. Well, Luke is that guy. He’s also been an actively involved American citizen, even before he started prepping, supporting Ron Paul, participating in rallies, tea parties, etc.
We’ve been developing this website for some time now and soon we’ll be launching a preparedness course that consists of a series of videos.
As of right now there’s a few articles by Luke and myself. They are on a similar line of thought to what you usually read here so if you are a frequent visitor I’m sure you’d like to look around a bit.
Here’s the GTA link.

Grab the Apple isn’t about predicting the end of the world, trying to estimate when a meteor will destroy man kind based on the Mayan calendar or reading the cabala in my breakfast bowl of Corn Flakes.
Its about having a prepared mindset regarding life in general.
Of course the economic situation is already a reality so that’s a topic covered often, but the idea is to prepare to live better lives, not preparing as an excuse to live a dark, miserable existence.

Hope you guys like the website and please do leave comments, thoughts and suggestions.

Take care everyone.

FerFAL

7 comments:

Bones said...

No forums? That's like forgetting the secret sauce!

MBABSIT said...

Sir,

I read (actually, DEVOURED) your book, and I have to tell you, it really calmed my fears. I live on the edge of a small town in Washington state, and am a sort-of prepper. I am currently building food and other stocks up in the event of a long-term bank holiday, or worse, a terrorist EMP assault (in my country, it's not a matter of IF, but WHEN). I have firearms (living in a CCW state SURE helps), but then, I've been shooting since age nine (I find that target shooting has a calming effect on my nerves!). I work from home at my own little investment business, one of my hobbies is leatherworking (since age 13).

I am currently taking gunsmithing courses through AGI, and I encourage other firearms owners to do the same (there is such a shortage of smiths).

I want to say that your book really calmed my fears regarding an economic collapse. Rawles' work has people living army-style and every day is action-packed, but when you look at history, at Weimar Germany, "it ain't so." The jewelry is a good idea, I've got to dig out my broken gold chains!

At the Catholic folk mass they sing, "...when I was anxious you calmed all my fears..." Thank you for calming my fears.

What you wrote currently goes on in California. I lived there for a number of years, and what you describe in Argentina is the norm in California. (Now I am in Washington, where I always have to clean and oil my guns!)

Anyway, a friend is determined to have her family leave via motor home when SHTF, but I'm going to sit it out (partly because I'm taking care of an elderly parent). Why go out looking for trouble and acting the tough guy when I can sit at home, watching a DVD and not caring because I've got food, water, powdered drinks, and soda stored?

Anyway, thank you for the book. I am giving the friend who wants to leave the title and your name, so she can get her own - and maybe talk some sense into her!

FerFAL said...

ok, we'll take care of that :)

FerFAL

Anonymous said...

How about adding perspectives from other regions? Zimbabwe went through some whoops, too bad you didn't know someone from there, to compare. It seems like they didn't have the intense crime, but I'm unsure about that. Maybe Zimbabwe is a template for what both Ar and the USSA are going to go through yet? Who knows. Here's a recent link about hyperinflation in Zimbabwe, the author encourages people to visit there, quite the opposite advice I would expect.

http://www.kitco.com/ind/Field/nov112009.html

Oh, and here's a video I find compelling, to say the least, your Dollar chart on GTA reminded me of it, they are similar:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZsY1rFr_yw

Anonymous said...

From talking to others, it seems as if, "the central bank of Zimbabwe is now the U.S. Federal Reserve!
We'll see how they like that in a year or two.
Now they're our monetary colony.
Sounds like their experiment in local currency was a total failure."

I wonder, how often and widespread are U.S. Dollars used in Argentina? Are they even close to replacing the Agentina money supply? Is there anything else widely used in place of offical Argentina money?

MBABSIT said...

Right now, USD is the WORST choice, given the fact that the U.S. is in the early stage of a hyperinflation.

The Euro is not much of a better choice. As one who is a professional investor, I would choose the Swiss Franc. Why? Backed by gold, not just a fiat like the crappy dollar.

Anonymous said...

I dunno about the Swiss Franc being backed by gold anymore, have a look at a section of this article:

In earlier decades, the Swiss franc displayed an 80% correlation with gold, because the Swiss constitution called for the franc to be backed by 40% with gold reserves. This link was broken however, when a panel of government experts delivered a report in October 1997 finding that 1,300-tons of gold “were no longer necessary for monetary purposes and could therefore be withdrawn from the Swiss National Bank’s (SNB) balance sheet and used for other purposes.”

Over a five-year period ending in March 2005, the SNB sold nearly 1,300-tons of its gold at an average selling price of $351.40 /oz, and raked in Sfr 21.1-billion. Thus, these controversial sales turned the Swiss franc into a “relic of the gold standard.” In June 2007, the SNB shocked the markets again, by saying it would sell another tranche of 250-tons of gold thru September 2009, and use the proceeds to increase its foreign exchange reserves.

The SNB’s decision to dump more than half of its gold holdings was in retrospect, one of the greatest blunders in financial market history.

http://financialsense.com/fsu/editorials/dorsch/2009/1119.html