Saturday, June 30, 2012

Preparedness: Getting Started


This video I kind of long but I’m pretty happy with the results. I start with a double column risk assessment, listing more likely events and those that are less probable, and how in many cases there’s cross over preparations that can be done to tackle several scenarios at a time.I believe it turned well and it would be of use both for those just now getting started with survival and preparedness and for the more experienced ones that may need to refocus their priorities some.
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FerFAL

3 comments:

SurvivalAndProsperity.com said...

Great video for both "newbies" and veteran "preppers." The storms of the past few days here in the U.S. which have left millions without power and sweltering in 90-100 degree Fahrenheit (32-37 degrees Celsius) temps are a good reminder as to why it's wise to focus one's preps on something more likely to happen (severe weather event) rather than something less likely to occur ("Zombie Apocalypse," for example).

Don Williams said...

1) Here is the report on the 15 leading causes of death in the USA --assault (murder) is low on the list (number 15 -- 0.7 percent.) Suicide is much higher (number 10 --1.5 percent).
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/LCWK9_2008.pdf

However, this obviously varies by location and age -- a young black man in Washington DC is at far higher risk of dying from homicide than he is from cancer or a heart attack.

But in most places you are at greater risk long term of dying from the stress of your job (or lack of one) than from murder. Many office workers do not realize the great damage to the heart caused by prolonged sitting over the years:

http://lifehacker.com/5800720/the-sitting-is-killing-you-infographic-illustrates-the-stress-of-prolonged-sitting-importance-of-getting-up

Don Williams said...

Here is a detailed table of US death statistics broken down by 100+ causes and by age group.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/deaths_2009_release.pdf