Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Firesteels & Ferrocerium Rods: Gear Check Alert!

This is from a member over at ar15.com

Something similar over at EDCforums.
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A number or reasons can cause your ferrocerium rod to decay/oxidize. It can be related to humidity, salty environment, even the gases produced by batteries kept in your kit. The results vary from pitting to complete rods turned to dust, leaving you without your trusty firestarter. This can happen both in generic ferrocerium rods and well-known brands. Cheaper rods may have a greater amount of iron, which rusts easily and may degrade the rod quicker and more extensively.
What can you do? Check periodically, keep it in a sealed bag. If your rod has been used and the protective layer removed, you may want to add a layer of paint to protect the exposed surface. Buy a thick rod and buy quality, something like the Light My Fire Original Swedish FireSteel.
Above all, have a backup! I know that for a lot of people their firesteel IS their backup, but don’t forget a Bic lighter and some strike anywhere matches in a ziplock bag just in case.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I had a ferro Rod go under Fresh water in a Leather Sheath soaked after a trip It corroded from the tanning acid. Treat the Fr with oil or as I do coat with Nail polish to seal before the trip

tim nelson said...

another reason to be proficient with bow drill or hand drill depending on environment. if i am using a rod to start fire, a bow drill is barely much more of an effort. and is reliable and regenerative.

Anonymous said...

another reason to be proficient with bow drill or hand drill depending on environment. if i am using a rod to start fire, a bow drill is barely much more of an effort. and is reliable and regenerative.

Anonymous said...

I have seen this happen years ago. I now paint the rods with finger nail polish after use. I works for me.

Anonymous said...

bow drills are very difficult compared to any "flint & steel" approach.

what about using magnesium rods instead given their veritable shower of sparks?

Anonymous said...

Many years ago, I had stored a Doan Magnesium block / spark rod inside a Water washer plastic cup, this implement using a filter of iodine (I think) to purify water. An inspection a year later determined both units were destroyed, likely the fumes of each causing the damage.

I've also stored a spark rod on the elastic sleeve of a Leatherman leather multi-tool pouch - it too demonstrated corrosion quickly. Still trying to figure that one out . . .

I'll try that fingernail polish treatment - thanks for the advice and post.